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The bakinglady

Welcome to the wonderful world of baking, cakes, cookies and traybakes,
everything you could ever dream of and more..
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Recipes...Yum!

Wet Nelly Pudding

Posted by me on November 27, 2016 at 11:20 AM Comments comments (1)


As a dirty ‘suv-er-ner’ I am familiar with good old fashioned, rib sticking bread puddin’s (my Dad, especially, makes a mean one!) rich with dried fruit and spices and normally soaked in cold tea or water then baked and served hot with creamy vanilla custard or cold (my favourite) with a dusting of granulated sugar. It was popular in the war years in London and the home counties as bread was un-rationed and ...

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Maids of honour tartlets

Posted by me on November 4, 2016 at 5:35 AM Comments comments (0)


One day (so legend has it) Henry the Eighth was strolling through Hampton palace and happened upon Anne Boleyn and her girlfriends eating these tasty little pastries from a silver dish, now Henry was so enthused by them that he decreed that only the royal household should be allowed to wrap their diamond encrusted gnashers around their pastry, almond and orange filling that he selfishly locked the recipe away in a...

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Grasmere Gingerbread

Posted by me on October 9, 2016 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (0)


An hour’s drive away up the M6 motorway from the Market town of Chorley in Lancashire (where I live) is the beautiful Cumbrian village of Grasmere, nestled amoungst the hills and mountains of some of the most picturesque scenery in the English Lake district. It is Famous for two things, the Poet William Wordsworth who lived in the village for fourteen years and proclaimed that Grasmere was “the loveliest spot tha...

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Yorkshire curd tarts

Posted by me on July 26, 2015 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (0)


There is an unwritten law, somewhere, that you can’t go to the Gods own county of Yorkshire without sampling a freshly baked curd tart, if by any chance there isn’t such a law then there jolly well should be!

Curd tarts are the English version of a baked cheesecake, long before those pesky American’s decreed that only they know how to make a New York cheesecake, we made them in ‘old’ York...

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Goosnargh Biscuits

Posted by me on July 26, 2015 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)


Makes approximately 20

Lancashire is rightly proud of its baking heritage and some of the delicious cakes and biscuits that originate in the county (probably to cheer the inhabitants up from having to live with the wet and windy climate for most of the year!)

Near to the City of Preston is a small pretty village with the quaint name of Goosnargh which is renowned for its caraway seeded shortbread although unfort...

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Chapel window cake

Posted by me on January 12, 2015 at 1:50 PM Comments comments (0)

In 1884 princess Victoria, the granddaughter of Queen Victoria married Prince Louis of Battenberg in Germany and a myth was born, the Battenberg cake…. It was said that the English bakers tried to emulate the skill of their German counterparts with their skills in modelling with marzipan and decorating cakes and created this tea time classic, shame it is probably just a story, as there is no historical evidence to bac...

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Cumberland rum Nicky (serves 8 generous slices)

Posted by me on November 25, 2014 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (0)

I can't describe just how good this gorgeous tart is and is the perfect alternative to traditional mince pies at Christmas but its just as good eaten any time of the year. Cumberland Rum Nicky originated in Cumbria in the North West of England as a favourite of Sailors in the 1800's returning from the West Indies on ships laden with Rum, fruit and spices and the 'Nicky' part of the name possibly refers...

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Scottish seedy, cheesy oatcakes (makes at least 15)

Posted by me on October 29, 2014 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (0)

In 1755 Samuel Johnson in his famous dictionary of the English language quoted rather unkindly to the staple diet of Scots (oats) as “a grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people’ to which Patrick Murray, 5th Lord Elibank of East Lothian replied ‘yes and where would you see such horses and such men!’

I for one wouldn’t argue with a big hairy Scots...

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Bourbon biscuits

Posted by me on April 20, 2014 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

I cannot imagine anything more British than sitting with your feet up on the sofa, watching slushy soap operas with a steaming mug of tea and a biscuit or three and these traditional Bourbon biscuits fit the bill perfectly, the only decision that has to be made is whether to dunk or not to dunk…..

Bourbon biscuits (or Bourbon creams) originated in Bermondsey, London in 1910 and were called Creola biscuits by their manu...

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Pork and apple pie

Posted by me on February 28, 2014 at 7:10 AM Comments comments (0)

There is something quintessentially English about a pork pie and I don't know of any other country that makes Hot water pastry. Crisp pastry enrobing succulent flavoursome pork with a layer of either jelly or in this instance Juicy Brambly apples on the top.... Absolutely delicious! I am very fortunate to have organic pork delivered to my front door by a young farmer with a smallholding and I like to make something different with...

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bacon 'canal' Floddies

Posted by me on October 20, 2013 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

In the 1800’sThe North East of England was criss crossed with canals with wonderful names like Dearne and Dove, the Erewash and the Pocklington that transported coal, lime, corn, flour and manure (you wouldn’t have wanted to confuse those two in a hurry) and the navvies working on the barges would cook these simple but lovely savoury potato and bacon cakes on a shovel over an open fire.

Floddies are a cross between a...

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Pikelets

Posted by me on September 21, 2013 at 2:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Long, long ago an Anglo Saxon or two (after they had of course finished marauding and smashing things up) would sit around the fire; drink ale and stuff their little hairy faces with the forefathers of these little pikelets. Unlike pikelets of today they were more like a hard pancake (and there wouldn’t have been any lovely jam or sugar and lemon juice to dollop on the top…. Poor unhappy hairy Anglo Saxons).

Pikel...

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Yorkshire Chubby Chaps with a tropical twist

Posted by me on September 9, 2013 at 4:40 AM Comments comments (1)

 

In the mid 19th century Yorkshire farmers would cook turf cakes on a spade over a turf fire. A cross between a traditional scone and a rock cake they would have been made with the simplest of ingredients, flour, sugar, a drop of fresh milk and an egg and if the farmer’s wife was feeling generous a handful of currants or raisins.

In 1919 a Swiss confectioner named Frederick Belmont founded the world famous...

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